WALL PANELS OF THE EXHIBITION "DIORAMA. INVENTING ILLUSION"

05.10.2017 | The exhibition “Diorama” offers the opportunity to step into the theatrical mechanisms of a diorama—a word which literally means “to see through.” This form of display is a staging device used to create a scene—real or unreal—in which historical figures or animal species are usually exhibited within their natural environment. The diorama, often conceived as a life-sized model, features a display case with a window, a painted background, and three-dimensional props in the foreground. Despite the physical barrier of the window, the viewer is projected into a virtual world that is also a metaphor of the exhibition itself.

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CATALOG ESSAY BY KATHARINA DOHM, CLAIRE GARNIER, LAURENT LE BON, FLORENCE OSTENDE

05.10.2017 | In a time when we are writing a history of closed, emptied and censored exhibitions, a show about the diorama almost automatically takes its place in the long list of impossible exhibitions. Often inextricably linked to its architecture, the diorama is an extremely complex exhibition form that sets the scene of a certain situation and its original environment. As a rule it consists of artificial decoration: a painted background, three-dimensional figures, scenographic elements and a pane between the scene and the spectators. Although the diorama embodies a centuries-old staging of “looking”, it still constitutes a blind spot in our cultural history. Having been widely used by natural history museums and acknowledged by contemporary artists, dioramas do not crop up in art history. Despite having played a significant role in literary and popular-cultural accounts in the 19th century, after 1900 the diorama was soon considered outdated.

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Splendor and Misery in the Weimar Republic. From Otto Dix to Jeanne Mammen

25.09.2017 | Social tensions, political struggles, social upheavals, as well as artistic revolutions and innovations characterize the Weimar Republic. Beginning October 27, 2017, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting German art from 1918 to 1933 in a major thematic exhibition. Direct, ironic, angry, accusatory, and often even prophetic works demonstrate the struggle for democracy and paint a picture of a society in the midst of crisis and transition. Many artists were moved by the problems of the age to mirror reality and everyday life in their search for a new realism or “naturalism.” They captured the stories of their contemporaries with an individual signature: the processing of World War I with depictions of maimed soldiers and “war profiteers,” public figures, the big city with its entertainment industry and increasing prostitution, political unrest and economic chasms, as well as the role model of the New Woman, the debates about paragraphs 175 and 218 (regarding punishability of homosexuality and abortion), the social changes resulting from industrialization, and the growing enthusiasm for sports. The exhibition provides an impressive panorama of a period that even today, 100 years after its advent, has lost nothing of its relevance and potential for discussion.

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Diorama. Inventing Illusion

13.09.2017 | From October 6, 2017 to January 21, 2018, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents a major exhibition dedicated to the cultural history of vision. It focuses on the diorama, which is used to reconstruct and realistically stage events, stories, and habitats with the aid of various means. Invented in the nineteenth century by the French painter and photography pioneer Louis Daguerre as a playhouse enlivened with light effects, it, as a glass showcase became the presentation form par excellence for natural history museums. The diorama stages human knowledge of the world, not without influencing and perpetually challenging the viewer’s perception. Being the first comprehensive examination of the diorama, the exhibition highlights both the various stories behind the development of this form of presentation and the correlations and chronological developments that took place parallel to it. The diorama has been a crucial source of inspiration to this day: Numerous artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries address questions of staged vision in their works by questioning and dissolving the illusion of a reconstructed reality. The exhibition at the Schirn presents the early forms of the diorama in religious art and its beginnings in the playhouse and showman art of the nineteenth century, and considers the diorama as the preferred form of presentation for museums conveying natural-historical and anthropological knowledge. The deconstruction of the diorama in today’s art is illustrated by large-scale installations, contemporary dioramas, sculptures, photographs, and films by such artists as Richard Baquié, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Mark Dion, Isa Genzken, Robert Gober, Mathieu Mercier, Kent Monkman, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Jeff Wall. The presentation develops an overall chronological narrative that traces the cultural history of vision and of exhibiting from various perspectives.

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Basquiat. Boom for Real

14.08.2017 | In the late 1970s, Jean-Michel Basquiat teamed up with Al Diaz to write enigmatic graffiti statements across the city under the pseudonym SAMO©. Soon he was drawing in his own blood, collaging baseball cards, creating his own clothing, and painting on doors, window frames, and enormous homemade canvases. Today, Basquiat (1960–1988) is acknowledged as one of the most significant artists of the 20th century. Having come of age in the post-punk underground art scene in Lower Manhattan, he conquered the art world and gained widespread international recognition, becoming the youngest artist ever to participate in the documenta in Kassel in 1982. Basquiat’s raw, vibrant imagery is matched by a startling erudition, seen in the fragments of bold, capitalized text that abound in his works. These bear witness to his encyclopedic interests and his experience as a young artist with no formal training. More than 30 years after Basquiat’s last major exhibition in Germany, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting a major survey devoted to this American artist, organized in collaboration with the Barbican Art Gallery, London. The exhibition is also the first to focus on Basquiat’s relationship to music, text, film, and television, situating the artist’s formidable talents within a broader cultural context.


PEACE

06.06.2017 | Doves, rainbow colors, and rifles adorned with flowers: depictions of peace are usually limited to familiar symbols. From 1 July to 24 September 2017, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt takes a different approach with the discursive group exhibitions PEACE addressing the question: How does peace actually work? The exhibition presents positions by 12 international artists. Jan De Cock, Minerva Cuevas, Ed Fornieles, Michel Houellebecq, Surasi Kusolwong, Isabel Lewis, Lee Mingwei, Katja Novitskova, Heather Phillipson, Agnieszka Polska, Timur Si-Qin, and Ulay consider the subject PEACE from a contemporary perspective.

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Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, General Information

11.05.2017 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt was officially opened on February 28, 1986. Since then, the Schirn has presented more than 220 exhibitions on roughly 2,000 m² of floor space – and welcomed over eight million visitors. The Schirn is not only one of the most prestigious and internationally recognized art institutions in Europe, but also a constant in the cultural life of the city of Frankfurt – a place of encounter where interested citizens, patrons and partners, young and established artists, dedicated friends and people from all over the world come together.

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PEACE

13.04.2017 | Doves, rainbow colors, and rifles adorned with flowers—depictions of peace are usually limited to standard clichés and familiar symbols. In a discursive group exhibition, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt pursues a different approach and addresses the question of how peace actually works. Proceeding from the premise that peace is reflected most clearly in processes of interaction and communication among people and among all of the players in the ecosystem, the exhibition focuses on phenomena that have always contributed to making human (co-)existence possible and sustainable, such as water, animals, language, or the culture of giving. The Schirn shows works by Jan de Cock, Minerva Cuevas, Ed Fornieles, Surasi Kusolwong, Isabel Lewis, Lee Mingwei, Katja Novitskova, Agnieszka Polska, and Timur Si-Qin, which offer a new, contemporary perspective on the subject of peace. The current reassessment of the Humanist view of the world and influence on the relationships between humankind and nature will play an important role in the presentation. The exhibition will be accompanied by numerous live events, including poetry readings, concerts, lectures, and cooking sessions in which visitors are invited to take part. The program will be developed in collaboration with the participating artists.

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Peace Logo Contest

29.03.2017 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt requests submissions for a new PEACE logo. The occasion: the discursive thematic exhibition “PEACE” that will be presented at the Schirn from July 1 to September 24, 2017. The new PEACE logo will be chosen by an independent jury, will be remunerated with prize money, and will be integrated into the exhibition communications. The deadline for receipt of entries is May 8, 2017. Dr. Philipp Demandt, Director of the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, describes the project as follows: “This summer with our ‘PEACE’ exhibition the Schirn sets out to explore how peace actually works, a question that is as compelling as ever today. Quite apart from this, we feel it is high time for a new PEACE logo, a logo for today that reflects our current notion of peace.”

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HOW WE ACT TOGETHER – SCHIRN PRESENTS INTERACTIVE ONLINE PERFORMANCE

02.12.2016 | For Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, US American artists and programmers Lauren McCarthy and Kyle McDonald developed an interactive performance project entitled How We Act Together (2016) that can be accessed starting today, November 29, 2016, online at www.schirn.de/hwat. Individuals can participate via the website from their own PC with a webcam. In addition, visitors to the Schirn can join in the project via an installation in the foyer. How We Act Together is a communal performance in the form of a video stream. The focus is on gestures as the most elementary forms of social interaction. Participants are asked to repeat one of four gestures ¬¬– nodding, screaming, greeting or eye contacting – until exhausted in front of their webcam. As soon as an algorithm programmed by McCarthy and McDonald recognizes the gesture, a video recording begins. The performance aims to be a competition and endurance is rewarded. Indeed, if a user performs the respective gesture longer than the person with the greatest stamina before them, their recording is included in the video stream and becomes part of the accumulated performance. The result is a collective sequence of videos choreographed by software featuring identical gestures by different people. This creates an asynchronous interaction within a group divided both spatially and temporally. The artists Lauren McCarthy and Kyle McDonald comment as follows: “With our project How We Act Together, which we conceived for the Schirn, we aim to show people how even the slightest gestures influence social interactions. The subject of interpersonal relationships has interested us both for a long time now – especially in the context of digital communication, which is often characterized by divided attention and the loss of real social connections. Drawing on the technological possibilities of facial recognition software, we visualize the discomfort that we sometimes encounter in social interactions in the wild.”

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THE SCHIRN NOW PRESENTS ITS FILM AND VIDEO ART SERIES DOUBLE FEATURE IN A NEW SETTING

10.11.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt has been offering a forum for national and international film and video artists with its monthly series of Double Feature events for more than four years. On the last Wednesday of every month, featured artists present a work from their oeuvre and a film of their choice to the audience. Following their presentations, they offer deeper insights into their art and their cinematic interests in an interview with series curators Katharina Dohm and Matthias Ulrich. The Schirn has now presented more than 50 artists in the Double Feature series. From now on, Double Feature will take place in the Schirn Café. Artist Judith Hopf (*1969), a professor at the Städelschule in Frankfurt, has designed a curtain for the film series that transforms the Schirn Café into a temporary movie theater once each month. Hopf is well known for her film and multimedia projects. Her works revolve around fundamental questions of relevance to existence and the relationships between human beings, animals and objects and the world. Judith Hopf presented a video piece of her own in Double Feature in 2013.

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GIACOMETTI–NAUMAN

27.10.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting a major exhibition of works by Alberto Giacometti and Bruce Nauman from October 28, 2016 until January 22, 2017. The show brings together two artists from different generations with totally different backgrounds. Giacometti (1901–1966) is regarded as one of the most important classical modern European sculptors. Nauman (*1941) and his multifaceted oeuvre represent the radical upheavals in contemporary art since 1960 and a concept of sculpture liberated from traditional concepts. Featuring some 70 works in all, this is the first exhibition ever devoted to both, Giacometti and Nauman. Sculptures and paintings by the Swiss artist engage in a fascinating dialogue with videos, sculptures, drawings, photographs, and spatial installations by the US multimedia artist. Giacometti is represented by works from nearly all of his important creative phases, Nauman primarily by his early oeuvre from the 1960s and early 1970s, which followed immediately on the heels of Giacometti’s works. Although the two artists never met and never referred explicitly to each other, they have a great deal in common. Both revolutionized the concepts and traditions of sculpture from the perspective of their respective times—Giacometti during the first half of the twentieth century, and Nauman from the 1960s to the present. Both are regarded as individualists who worked consistently from a position of self-imposed isolation and loneliness that has left an indelible imprint on their uncompromising art. Both represent utterly radical artistic standpoints, and both have created works of shocking immediacy that pose lasting challenges for viewers. Giacometti and Nauman have ventured with their oeuvres into uncharted regions of art and perception. Their search for artistic truth is a quest, the outcome of which is often manifested in the creative process itself rather than in finished works. The two artists have elevated failure, the absurd, the fragmentary, and the unheroic to the status of essential elements of their art. The art of both Giacometti and Nauman revolves around the human being. Giacometti was concerned consistently and almost exclusively with the human figure in his sculptures and paintings, and he developed an original human image of his own with his unmistakable style of figuration, especially during the years after 1945. Bruce Nauman’s work during the 1960s and 1970s was focused above all on the human body (primarily his own), which he took as the point of departure for an investigation into fundamental questions about human nature and the conditions governing human existence. The exhibition enhances our grasp of the oeuvres of two outstanding representatives of the art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Giacometti becomes recognizable as a pioneer who paved the way for important developments in art after the 1960s and regains certain aspects of his original radical artistic position, whereas Nauman’s outstanding importance as a sculptor is made clear and historically comprehensible in a different way. The exhibition at the Schirn presents works from leading museums and collections in the United States and Europe, including the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., the Tate in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti in Paris, the Fondation Marguerite et Aimé Maeght in Saint-Paul de Vence, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebæk, the Fondation Beyeler in Basel/Riehen, the Lehmbruck Museum in Duisburg, the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, and the Hamburger Kunsthalle.

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ULAY

12.10.2016 | From October 13, 2016, to January 8, 2017, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting the first-ever major survey exhibition of works by the exceptional artist Ulay. Ulay describes himself rather self-deprecatingly as the “most famous unknown artist”. For almost half a century, he has been radically merging art and his own life. His concept of transformation enables Ulay to constantly create new identities. His medium of choice is analog photography and, in particular, Polaroids, which form an essential part of his artistic practice. To this day, his body remains the object of his research; it is marked by various influences and can be read like a canvas. How is identity expressed within the body, and which strategies might alter identity? These are questions Ulay seeks to answer in his work. Skin is of particular significance. The artist sees it as the surface of both the body and the photograph. By shaping the skin, piercing it, or adorning it with symbols, he tells confrontational stories about identity and the transgressions to which it is exposed. In addition to numerous individual actions of performative photography and Body Art, Ulay has also realized a great number of performances and projects with other artists: he created photographic series with his former muse Paula Françoise-Piso in which he intensified self-analysis until the complete dissolution of the self; with the artist Marina Abramovi?, he managed to further evolve performance art, setting the standard to this day. In addition, he developed a number of participatory works with people from marginalized groups. Ulay defines photography and performance art in a distinctive and very personal way. The notion of “Identity through change” remains central to his work and allows him to elude any fixed attributions of identity. The retrospective exhibition at the Schirn brings together his remarkable oeuvre from 1970 to 2016. On show are more than 150 works, including photographs, films, project documentations, objects, and sculptures, as well as works on paper. The public will be presented for the first time with a number of works that the artist previously held back due to his absolute need to be present, and his skepticism of the art world. On the occasion of the opening of the exhibition at the Schirn, Ulay will present his performance “Who am I?”.

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PHILIPP DEMANDT TAKES OFFICE AS NEW DIRECTOR IN FRANKFURT AM MAIN

29.09.2016 | The Städel Museum, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung have a new director. On 1 October 2016, Dr Philipp Demandt will begin his work at the head of the three cultural institutions of Frankfurt. The art historian was chosen within the framework of an intensive national and international search for a successor to Max Hollein. He was previously the director of the Alte Nationalgalerie, a museum of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin – Preussischer Kulturbesitz. At the press conference held today on the occasion of his assumption of office, Demandt (b. 1971) was introduced by Prof Dr Nikolaus Schweickart, chairman of the Städel Museum administration, and Dr Ina Hartwig, deputy mayor in charge of culture of the city of Frankfurt am Main.

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PHILIPP DEMANDT TAKES OFFICE AS NEW DIRECTOR IN FRANKFURT AM MAIN

29.09.2016 | The Städel Museum, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung have a new director. On 1 October 2016, Dr Philipp Demandt will begin his work at the head of the three cultural institutions of Frankfurt. The art historian was chosen within the framework of an intensive national and international search for a successor to Max Hollein. He was previously the director of the Alte Nationalgalerie, a museum of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin – Preussischer Kulturbesitz. At the press conference held today on the occasion of his assumption of office, Demandt (b. 1971) was introduced by Prof Dr Nikolaus Schweickart, chairman of the Städel Museum administration, and Dr Ina Hartwig, deputy mayor in charge of culture of the city of Frankfurt am Main.

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Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt

29.09.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt was officially opened on February 28, 1986. Since then, the Schirn has presented more than 220 exhibitions on roughly 2,000 m² of floor space – and welcomed over eight million visitors. The Schirn is not only one of the most prestigious and internationally recognized art institutions in Europe, but also a constant in the cultural life of the city of Frankfurt – a place of encounter where interested citizens, patrons and partners, young and established artists, dedicated friends and people from all over the world come together.

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ROSA BARBA. BLIND VOLUMES

26.09.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting Blind Volumes, an installation realized by Berlin based artist Rosa Barba (*1972), from September 23, 2016 until January 8, 2017. In this work created specifically for the Schirn, in which she responds to the openly accessible public setting of the rotunda, Barba combines the artistic media of film and sculpture. Inside the rotunda, she has erected an expansive, geometrically intricate steel construction consisting of some 80 serial framework elements. The work is twelve meters tall and nearly fills the entire lobby of the Schirn. The complex structure, which resembles a building skeleton and calls to mind the Constructivist visions of the early twentieth century, confronts visitors with a wealth of possible associations. Rosa Barba uses the installation as the stage for a dynamic choreography combining visual imagery, light, and sound. The artist also cites a selection of her own works, which are presented here in a new constellation. In addition to the film-based sculpture entitled One Way Out (2009) and Conductor (2014), a rhythmically pulsating sound object, the Schirn is also showing two new works by Rosa Barba in conjunction with the Blind Volumes exhibition: In White Museum – Live (2016), 70-mm and 16-mm film projectors appear as actors in an acoustically controlled light show. This work originated in a live performance of the same title presented by Barba in collaboration with the well-known US drummer Chad Taylor at MoMA PS1 in New York last spring. It represents a continuation of the White Museum series she first introduced in 2010, in which a film image is projected as a rectangular field of light into outdoor space from museum buildings. About the Plate and Receiver (2016), a 16-mm film also featured in the installation, is a poetic reflection on space and time, the autonomy of technology, and the limits of human knowledge accompanied by electronic music. It is an outgrowth of one of Barba’s most recent installations in the White Museum series, a work she realized at the Hirsch Observatory of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The various film and sculptural works will be presented continuously in the Schirn rotunda in an arrangement conceived by the artist.

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ART FOR ALL. THE COLOR WOODCUT IN VIENNA AROUND 1900

05.07.2016 | This exhibition is a first. The woodcut is one of the oldest printing techniques known and reached its zenith during the Middle Ages with Albrecht Dürer. Over the centuries the technique was increasingly forgotten, only to be rediscovered quite suddenly throughout Europe in a trend-setting development at the beginning of the 20th century. This was also the case in Vienna, where numerous artists, including a remarkable number of women, breathed new life into the color woodcut. From July 6 to October 3, 2016 the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is dedicating a major, long overdue exhibition to this previously largely neglected phenomenon. Some 240 works by over 40 artists – also employing related techniques such as linocut and block printing – give an impressive overview of the subject and demonstrate for the first time the full extent of the aesthetic and social achievements of the color woodcut in Vienna around the turn of the last century. The presentation examines the remarkable enthusiasm with which not only established painters, but also newcomers devoted their attention to the color woodcut during a short but all the more intensive golden age between 1900 and 1910 in Vienna. Among them were members of the Vienna Secession whose names are still familiar today, such as Carl Moll and Emil Orlik, as well as artists who have been almost forgotten like Gustav Marisch, Jutta Sika, Viktor Schufinsky and Marie Uchatius. The latter were all students of the Wiener Kunstgewerbeschule (College of Applied Arts), which was particularly popular among talented young artists. They were fascinated by the technical and formal possibilities of the traditional printing technique, which offered the artistic imagination tremendous freedom. It considerably influenced the emergence of a modern pictorial language at the beginning of the 20th century with its characteristic outline drawings and its stylizsed planar representational style. Moreover, thanks to its affordable prices even for original prints, the color woodcut opened up the previously elitist art market to a broad public. Within the social reformist movement “Kunst für Alle” (Art for All) it encouraged a lively discussion about authenticity and originality on the one hand as well as encouraging artistic creativity beyond the so-called “ivory tower” on the other – topics which have lost nothing of their relevance to this day. The extent to which the color woodcut contributed to a concept of art which aimed to encompass all aspects of life, can be seen in this exhibition. It is assembled in cooperation with the Albertina in Vienna and includes numerous loans from Viennese museums and institutions as well as from estates and private collections.

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PIONEERS OF THE COMIC STRIP. A DIFFERENT AVANT-GARDE

22.06.2016 | Spectacular, large and colorful – this is how comic strips captivated their audience, beginning back in 1897. The middle classes, working classes, and a host of immigrants were equally fascinated by the unfamiliar visual experience they encountered in American newspapers. From June 23 to September 18, 2016, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting the first extensive thematic exhibition on the “Pioneers of the Comic Strip,” who—progressive and eager to experiment—set the artistic and content-related standards of the early comic strips. The exhibition features six outstanding, primarily American illustrators who shaped the cultural history of the comic strip: Winsor McCay, Lyonel Feininger, Charles Forbell, Cliff Sterrett, George Herriman, and Frank King. Unforgotten are Herriman’s absurd humor in Krazy Kat (from 1913), the Surrealist and Expressionist visual worlds of McCay (from 1904) and Sterrett (from 1912 onwards), Feininger’s comic strips for the Chicago Tribune (1906-7), or the comic strip Gasoline Alley by King (from 1921) told in real time over a period of three decades. With Forbell’s synthesis of the arts Naughty Pete (1913), the Schirn enables visitors to the exhibition to rediscover a forgotten illustrator.

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PETER HALLEY. THE SCHIRN RING

11.05.2016 | From May 12 to August 21, 2016 the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting the installation The Schirn Ring by the American artist Peter Halley (*1953). Halley has developed a multi-part installation, using the architecture and spatial conditions of the Rotunda and the Schirn Kunsthalle as his starting point. Halley’s installation begins in the exterior space of the Rotunda, then extends into the interior of the Schirn, employing the two ring-like galleries that surround the Rotunda as well as the adjacent exhibition space on the second floor. Across an area of some 450 m² Halley has designed an atmospheric, spatially complex, inventively coded environment that draws on both current and older elements of the artist’s oeuvre. Halley achieved notable fame in the 1980s with his Day-Glo geometric paintings that challenged previous assumptions about abstract art through his insistence that geometry is always tied to social realities. Today he is considered to be one of the most influential artists and art theorists in the United States. Since the mid-1990s he has also been creating site-specific installations for art galleries and public spaces in Europe, America, and Asia. Peter Halley’s installations are always grounded in his understanding of the cultural and architectural context of the spaces for which they are made. Thus, the development of The Schirn Ring was preceded by an intensive study of the architectural and conceptual context of the Schirn Rotunda. Halley sees the architecture of the Rotunda as loaded with cultural associations: the Rotunda’s form echoes that of the nearby historical, Neo-classical Paulskirche. At the same time, it is on axis with the adjacent Frankfurt Dom. From there, Halley went on to explore analogous elements in the architecture of the Schirn Rotunda and the design of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. He imagined the Rotunda itself as a high-energy collider full of explosive energy bathed in yellow light.

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Max Hollein leaves post at the Städel Museum, Liebieghaus Sculpture Collection and Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt

23.03.2016 | After more than fifteen years in Frankfurt am Main, Max Hollein is resigning as head of the Städel Museum, Liebieghaus Sculpture Collection and Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt. As of 1 June 2016, Hollein will serve as director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF), the largest public art institution in Northern California and, with 1.6 million visitors in 2014, the fourth most frequently visited museum in the U.S.

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ME

09.03.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting self-portraits by contemporary artists in the thematic exhibition “ME” from March 10 to May 29, 2016. The show features 40 international positions in painting, photography, video, sculpture, and performance art, including works by artists such as John Bock, Eberhard Havekost, Alicja Kwade, Mark Leckey, Nam June Paik, Pamela Rosenkranz, Rosemarie Trockel, and Erwin Wurm.

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THE SCHIRN TURNS THIRTY

25.02.2016 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt was officially opened on February 28, 1986. Since then, the Schirn has presented more than 220 exhibitions on roughly 2,000 m² of floor space – and welcomed over eight million visitors. The Schirn is not only one of the most prestigious and internationally recognized art institutions in Europe, but also a constant in the cultural life of the city of Frankfurt – a place of encounter where interested citizens, patrons and partners, young and established artists, dedicated friends and people from all over the world come together. In the first highlight of its anniversary year 2016, the Schirn is presenting the exhibition entitled “Joan Miró. Painting Walls, Painting Worlds“. The grand Schirn Summerfest will also be part of the thirtieth-anniversary celebration.

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JOAN MIRÓ. PAINTING WALLS, PAINTING WORLDS

15.02.2016 | Joan Miró (1893–1983) once famously declared that he wanted to “assassinate” painting. Today he is widely regarded as one of the greatest artists of the 20th century. From February 26 through to June 12, 2016 Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents an until now little discussed aspect of his oeuvre in a focused solo exhibition: Miró’s preference for large-scale formats and his fascination with the wall. In his painterly practice, the wall was the starting point – both as an object to be depicted and as an inspiration for the textural quality of his works. Miró distanced himself from the simple reproduction of reality and equated the picture plane with the wall. He explored the structure of its surface and aimed to dissolve the boundaries of the image space. His particular approach with the wall explains the care with which he selected and prepared the materials and the grounds of his pictures at every stage of his career. Miró’s paintings hereby gained the haptic qualities and textures of wall surfaces. The artist used whitewashed canvas, coarse burlap, Masonite (hardboard), sandpaper and tarpaper in order to create unique visual worlds of outstanding materiality. The exhibition at the Schirn covers over half a century of Miró’s oeuvre, beginning with his emblematic painting The Farm / La Ferme (1921/22), continuing with his iconic dream paintings of the 1920s, his key work Painting (The Magic of Colour) / Peinture (La Magie de la couleur) from 1930, his works and frieze formats painted on unconventional grounds in the 1940s and 1950s and ending with the artist’s late works, such as the monumental triptych Blue I–III / Bleu I–III (1961) and the extraordinary Painting I–III / Peinture I–III (July 27, 1973). The Schirn exhibition brings together around 50 works from important museums and public collections across the world, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., the Museo Reina Sofi?a, Madrid, and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, as well as important private collections, and aims to present a new approach to Miró’s art.

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PRESS RELEASE: HEATHER PHILLIPSON. EAT HERE

19.11.2015 | Beginning November 20, 2015, the British artist Heather Phillipson will present her first solo show in Germany — an installation for the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt’s Rotunda. “EAT HERE”, her large-scale multimedia work, addresses the heart — as motif, metaphor and, above all, as biological imperative.

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THE SCHIRN KUNSTHALLE FRANKFURT'S NEW WEBSITE

27.10.2015 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting its new website at www.schirn.de/en. Besides a fundamentally altered design, the new web presence is based on a pioneering concept: to offer visitors a digital companion—before, during, and after visiting an exhibition. In doing so, the Schirn is responding in an innovative way to the demanding and changing use behavior of its visitors. The new website was developed based on the needs of all groups of visitors. It focuses on extensive information about the exhibitions as well as the overall Schirn program with its wide range of educational and communication opportunities. An intelligent technical set-up enables the display of individualized as well as differentiated contents and information about the Schirn depending on the respective device in use, the day of the week, and the time of access. Within only a few months, the Schirn designed and implemented this new website in collaboration with the Frankfurt-based digital agency Henne / Ordnung. It features a slender main navigation; a clear, dynamic visual language; a dual distribution of text, image, and video contents at the central axis; as well as a semantic search, consistently carrying on the Schirn’s corporate identity. The site is responsive, which means that it is viewable on all popular screen sizes—from the smartphone and the tablet to the desktop computer—without restrictions. Besides the Schirn website, the visuals of the Schirn Magazine www.schirn-mag.com were also fundamentally altered. For the purpose of reinforcing its magazine character, a different typography was selected than for the new website. The text, image, and video elements have more space, can be displayed larger than ever before, and in doing so facilitate reading ease.

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PRESS RELEASE: STORM WOMEN. WOMEN ARTISTS OF THE AVANT-GARDE IN BERLIN 1910–1932

23.10.2015 | The STURM heralded the advent of modern art. Originally the name of a magazine founded in 1910 devoted to promoting expressionist art, the term STURM (English: STORM) soon assumed the character of a trademark. Herwarth Walden, the publisher of the journal, also founded the STURM gallery in Berlin in 1912. Numerous women artists, including many from other countries, were presented in Germany for the first time at his gallery. As a movement, the STURM represented a program—one that opposed conceptual barriers, the establishment in general, and the bourgeois character of Wilhelminian society and advocated the total freedom of all arts and styles. Composed of friends with similar interests, the STURM network served as a forum for intensive and animated discourse on the ideas, theories, and concepts of the avant-garde. The additional STURM evenings, the newly founded STURM academy, the STURM theater and bookshop as well as occasional balls and a cabaret offered the artists of the STURM a variety of platforms and made the diverse artistic currents and tendencies in Berlin during the years from 1910 to 1930 accessible to a broad public. The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is devoting an extensive topical exhibition to the women of the STURM beginning on October 30, 2015. For the first time ever, eighteen women STURM artists representing Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, and the New Objectivity will be presented in a comprehensive exhibition featuring around 280 works of art. The presentation is a somewhat different survey of the most important currents in avant-garde art in Berlin in the early years of the twentieth century. Among the best-known artists represented in the show are Sonia Delaunay, Alexandra Exter, Natalja Goncharova, Else Lasker-Schüler, Gabriele Münter, and Marianne von Werefkin. They are joined by a number of largely unknown or less familiar artists, among them Marthe Donas, Jacoba van Heemskerck, Hilla von Rebay, Lavinia Schulz, and Maria Uhden.

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PRESS RELEASE: DANIEL RICHTER. HELLO, I LOVE YOU

28.09.2015 | From October 9, 2015 the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is exhibiting a new series by the German painter Daniel Richter in a focused solo presentation. Around 25 paintings, which will be presented to the public for the first time in the Schirn, mark a caesura in the artist’s oeuvre. Daniel Richter (* 1962) is one of the influential artists of his generation; since the late 1990s his works have been celebrated in numerous exhibitions. In his new works Richter breaks with all that seemed familiar in his painting hitherto. In the past two years he has focused on a question which represents a challenge for him: “How can a picture be reduced formally while being charged at the same time as regards content?” In his search for answers and solutions Richter has developed a new pictorial language which defies the customary motifs and painting methods as well as the familiar colours and themes. His works are characterised by a remarkable stylistic complexity and versatility: From about the year 2000 he confronted the abstract-ornamental paintings created from the mid-1990s with large-format, more strongly figurative and narrative pictures of a socio-political reality. Through the intersection of art-historical, mass-media and pop-culture clichés he has created idiosyncratic worlds. In 2015 he reduced the pictorial means, simplified the painting method; the tried and tested pictorial themes have disappeared and the picture has been brought back to its abstract primal state. The paintings in the new series seek an unusual confrontation. On a formal and content-based level the artist brings about a clash between simplified masses of colours and significance. Richter’s painting against his own routine has resulted in fascinating works which not only reveal a transformation, but also a remarkable new development stage in the artist’s oeuvre.

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PRESS RELEASE: DOUG AITKEN

08.07.2015 | From July 9, 2015, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt dedicates its entire exhibition space, inside and out, to the impressive work of American multimedia-artist Doug Aitken. It is not only the most comprehensive solo presentation of Aitken's work in Germany and beyond, but also an exhibition transcending spatial boundaries: The Schirn will present Aitken's kaleidoscopic universe as a survey of the major stages in more than 1400 square meters of exhibition space. “SONG 1” (2012/2015), “Black Mirror” (2011), “migration (empire)” (2008) and “diamond sea” (1997) will be shown in atmospheric spaces with corresponding sculptures, such as “Sunset (black and white)” (2011) and “Listening” (2011). “Sonic Fountain II” (2013/2015) will transform the public and freely accessible Rotunda of the Schirn into an acoustic-spherical space. Born in 1968 in Redondo Beach, California, Aitken transcends boundaries with his award-winning work. He combines film and music, architecture, performance and sculpture in a dynamic way. For more than 20 years, he has been creating works of art of fascinating audiovisual intensity and suggestive-seductive power. Aitken belongs to a generation of artists who have reassessed and decisively influenced the way we look at art: His works bear witness to a more profound observation of reality and reflect a philosophical analysis of the present world. He takes the viewers of his work on a synesthetic journey around the world and to their inner self – in a maelstrom of expressive and rhythmically structured images. He poses existential questions, but does not provide easy answers. Instead, the artist expresses an almost ingenious enthusiasm for humanity and communal interaction. His themes continuously revolve around human civilization: the alienation of the individual and isolation in the mass; man's relationship with nature and technology; and technology’s coexistence with nature as well as human relationships per se.

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PRESS RELEASE: ALICJA KWADE. THE VOID OF THE MOMENT IN MOTION

17.03.2015 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents the Berlin artist Alicja Kwade’s installation “Die bewegte Leere des Moments” (The Void of the Moment in Motion) specifically developed for its Rotunda from March 26 until June 14, 2015. The work leaves leeway for subjective perception and association. The threat it radiates makes itself almost physically felt. Or is it rather a feeling of uncertainty, of irritation that creeps up on the viewer? A motor with a circular thread is mounted in the center of the ceiling of the publicly accessible Rotunda. The stone with a diameter of about thirty centimeters hanging on a chain reaches to the upper, second story. A large, two-sided analogue clock with a diameter of about fifty centimeters has been mounted across from it at the height of the lower, first story. Both objects rotate around the central axis of the cylinder-shaped space and are incessantly reflected in the building’s fenestrated façade covered with mirror backing foil. The objects following their infinite paths at unchanging speed produce a variety of sensory stimuli. You hear the monotonous ticking of the clock, and the continuing movement causes a constant hissing sound. The reflection brings forth an endless multiplication and doubling, which deprives the Rotunda of its spatial boundaries and creates a limitless number of parallel universes. Being at the mercy of this all-embracing circular movement, man is, as it were, entirely integrated into a specific cosmos. With her installation “Die bewegte Leere des Moments” (The Void of the Moment in Motion), Alicja Kwade opens up a space of its own for the visitor, a space that offers possibilities for new perspectives and considerations, increases the viewer’s powers of concentration, and sharpens all his senses. What do I actually see? What do time, motion, and space mean for the individual? To what extent do scientific findings provide orientation and support in this specific constellation?

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PRESS RELEASE: ARTISTS AND PROPHETS. A SECRET HISTORY OF MODERN ART 1872-1972

05.03.2015 | In the large-scale exhibition entitled “Artists and Prophets. A Secret History of Modern Art 1872–1972” the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents an in-depth appraisal of a long, yet largely unknown chapter in the history of European – and most notably German – art. Featuring over 400 works and accompanying exhibits, including paintings, drawings, lithographs as well as extensive and rare documentary material, the show reveals astonishing causal relationships between artists of the modern period and self-styled “prophets“. The exhibition embeds these artists and prophets in a broad socio-historical context that spans a period of 100 years. Featuring unique and rarely exhibited works by such artists as František Kupka, Egon Schiele, Johannes Baader, Heinrich Vogeler, Friedrich Schröder-Sonnenstern, Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Joseph Beuys, and Jörg Immendorff on loan from the National Gallery in Prague, the Leopold Museum in Vienna, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Hundertwasser Stiftung in Vienna, the Kunsthaus Zürich, the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin as well as numerous private foundations and collectors, the presentation at the Schirn is the highlight of the 2015 spring exhibition season.

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PRESS RELEASE: POETRY OF THE METROPOLIS. THE AFFICHISTES

06.02.2015 | Whether categorized as early Pop artists, trailblazers of Street Art, or protagonists of a “natural poetry” of reality: in the 1950s, the “Affichistes” came forward with a completely new concept of the panel painting. On their rambles through the streets of postwar Paris and Rome, they collected fragments of ubiquitous, overlayered, often weathered and tattered posters and elevated the world of everyday urban life itself to the status of a painting. Their access to reality, as subversive as it was poetic, made them pioneers of a “New Realism.” The comprehensive overview at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt highlights the Affichistes’ radical art for the first time in Germany after twenty years. Comprising 150 exhibits, the show encompasses the entire range of the art of poster tearing, from small fragments to overwhelming formats, from abstract color formations to icons of Pop culture – supplemented by photographic, filmic, and poetic experiments by the artists represented in the exhibition: Raymond Hains, Jacques Villeglé, François Dufrêne as well as Mimmo Rotella and Wolf Vostell.

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FREE WIFI IN THE SCHIRN AND THE STÄDEL

02.02.2015 | Starting with the new exhibition year 2015, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt and the Städel Museum offer free-of-charge WiFi throughout their premises; visitors of both art institutions will have free access to the Internet as of February 05, 2015. The Schirn and the Städel are the first two venues of this size in Germany, which provide free-of-charge and unlimited WiFi in all their exhibition areas. During their visit, users will be able to communicate online, inform themselves about contents and subjects of the presented shows, exchange views in the social media, for instance, as well as capture special experiences and share them directly and rapidly. In addition, visitors may download digital educational offers such as the digitorials, apps, and audio guides for specific shows and collections successfully used by both institutions, and run these offers on their own devices. In addition, articles and videos from the Schirn magazine, the Städel blog, and the YouTube channels of both houses are easily accessible for use online during visits of the Schirn and the Städel. The Schirn’s WiFi will be available with the start of the exhibition “Poetry of the Metropolis. The Affichistes” from February 05, 2015. The Städel’s WiFi can also be used as of February 05, 2015.

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EXHIBITION PROGRAM 2015

01.01.2015 | Whether early Pop artists, trailblazers of Street Art, or protagonists of a “natural poetry” of reality: in the 1950s, the “Affichistes” came forward with a complete new concept of the panel painting. On their rambles through the streets of postwar Paris, they collected fragments of ubiquitous, overlayered, often weathered and tattered posters and elevated the world of everyday urban life itself to the status of a painting. Their access to reality, as subversive as it was poetic, made them pioneers of a “New Realism”. The Schirn acknowledges the art of the “Affichistes” with an extensive exhibition, shining a light on its special role within the avant-garde of the 1950s and 1960s. A total of 150 exhibits will present the entire spectrum of the art of tearing off posters, from small fragments to enormous large formats, from abstract color formations to icons of Pop culture – supplemented by photographic, cinematic, and poetic experiments by the participating artists: François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Jacques Villeglé, as well as Mimmo Rotella and Wolf Vostell.

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THE MINISCHIRN: A GAMES AND LEARNING CIRCUIT FOR CHILDREN AT THE MINISCHIRN

01.12.2014 | Since December 2014, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt offers a space of creative experience for children from the age of three to primary school age: the MINISCHIRN. This innovative permanent installation pivoted on the topics of color, form, and structure offers the institution’s youngest visitors an extraordinary games and learning circuit. In the first half-year after its opening the MINISCHIRN has already attracted more than 5,000 children. On the one hand, the circuit is strongly frequented by day care center and primary school groups from Frankfurt and the Rhein-Main area; on the other, individual children embark on a voyage of discovery on their own, while their parents visit the Schirn’s current exhibitions with concentration and at ease. There is no admission fee for these children. The MINISCHIRN offers a stimulating environment in which the young visitors may move around independently and consciously without their parents or adult guardians under supervision by the art education department’s didactically trained staff. With its MINISCHIRN concept, the Schirn Kunsthalle underscores its pioneering role in the art education of children and young visitors and presents itself as a vibrant cultural institution for a diversified public.

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PEDAGOGICAL CONCEPT, ARCHITECTURE, AND TARGET GROUPS OF THE MINISCHIRN

01.12.2014 | An artistically designed space for experience, the MINISCHIRN offers its young visitors a secure haven where they may give free rein to their urge to move and their passion for discovering things and will find a counterweight to the restricted sensory and motor possibilities provided by most exhibition projects in the fine arts.

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PRESS RELEASE: GERMAN POP

27.10.2014 | This fall will be under the sign of Pop Art. In a large-scale exhibition, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents from 6 November 2014 a broad panorama of Pop Art in its unique German variation – an art-historical phenomenon that has been largely neglected to date. Pop, which began in Great Britain and the USA and was quickly established there as a universal culture across genres, took on an original artistic expression in the 1960s in the then still young Federal Republic of Germany. In contrast to the often sensationalist and glamorous vocabulary of their Anglo-American colleagues, artists living in West Germany such as Thomas Bayrle, Christa Dichgans, K. H. Hödicke, Konrad Klapheck, Ferdinand Kriwet, Uwe Lausen, Sigmar Polke, and Gerhard Richter grapple in their works with the less grandiose banalities of everyday life in Germany, ironically commenting on the ideals of petit-bourgeois taste and the oppressive and deceptive coziness of the 1960s. Germany’s economic miracle was followed by an attempt to come to terms politically with its recent past. Processes of democratization were also found in the fine arts, along with a search for a new identity and a redefinition of the concept of art.

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PRESS RELEASE: HELENE SCHJERFBECK

18.09.2014 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents from October 2, 2014 until January 11, 2015, a comprehensive solo exhibition on Finnish Modernism’s most important woman artist: Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946). More than eighty-five paintings and works on paper offer a complete view of the painter’s and draftswoman’s daring pictorial world. Still to be discovered by many art lovers in Germany, Schjerfbeck, born in Helsinki, is highly acclaimed and celebrated as a national icon in Scandinavia and particularly in Finland, the Guest of Honor of this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair. She has produced an extensive impressive oeuvre with the human figure at its center: portraits of young women with fashionable accessories, male nudes, pictures of protagonists in historical paintings, and, above all, numerous likenesses of her own. Initially tending toward a naturalistic realism, Helene Schjerfbeck became a modern, avant-garde artist relying on a reduced language of forms and range of colors. Despite her clear penchant for abstraction, the artist remained devoted to figurative painting more than anything else. Her entire work is characterized by the repetition of motifs and the use of visual source material which she assembled to hybrid compositions. These principles are to be found in her impressive self-portraits as well as in numerous works in which she draws on motifs of important old masters such as Hans Holbein the Younger and El Greco or contemporary artists like Constantin Guys. Schjerfbeck also produced a number of extraordinary portraits testifying an increased interest in the fashion of her time – an aspect that has only drawn little attention in art historical research to date and is now explored in more detail in the Schirn’s presentation for the first time. Schjerfbeck was fascinated with portraiture, albeit not in its original sense: the artist rather overturned the classical role of portraiture completely by not rendering the individuality of her subjects. Continuous reinterpretation makes the portraits clearly reflect the artists’s unique pictorial idea. Organized by the Schirn in collaboration with Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery the exhibition comprises outstanding loans from the Ateneum and public collections as well as rarely accessible impressive works from private collections.

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PRESS RELEASE: ANDREAS SCHULZE. PEA ROADS

17.09.2014 | Andreas Schulze is one of the most interesting German painters of his generation. He creates artificial worlds filled with apparently ordinary everyday objects in his distinctive spatial installations and large-format, vividly colored paintings. Tables, chairs, wing armchairs; potted plants, porcelain, colorful blankets; wooden beams, buttons, and peas – besides the amorphous and spiral-shaped objects, these are the protagonists in his deserted, unreal pictures. The artist, born in 1955, has developed a large-format, extensive new wall painting especially for the Rotunda of the Schirn. Beginning on September 18, Schulze’s “Pea Roads” will span a total of 400 square meters on two floors. For his new work, the painter stylizes the eponymous peas, which time and again populate his pictures, to roughly two thousands fluorescent circles whose monumentality and complexity create the impression of being a network of streets from a bird’s-eye view. This impression is heightened further when it is dark and the peas begin to glow – to the viewer, the “Pea Roads” seem like nighttime satellite images of an urban infrastructure. Applied to a violet, anthracite, white background, the peas appear to flow from one floor into the other like meandering water. The round structure seems to be the ideal venue for Schulze, who often plays with views from inside and outside in his oeuvre and frequently works with perspectives through windows and interiors. In the early 1980s, Schulze achieved national and international recognition for his unconventional and multifaceted style of painting, and he is highly regarded by both critics as well as artists for his cryptic and sometimes bizarre works. His pictures stand out not only due to their surreal and ironic features, but also due to their enormous size and recurring motifs. Besides paintings, he produces entire interiors and combines genres such as sculpture and painting.

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NEW DIGITAL EDUCATION OFFER: PREPARING YOUR EXHIBITION VISIT WITH THE DIGITORIAL

16.09.2014 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, the Städel Museum and the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung are launching a completely new digital education format with their digitorial: relying on an innovative form of storytelling, enlightening backgrounds, art-historical and historico-cultural contexts, as well as crucial exhibition contents are made easily accessible to all visitors interested in preparing their tour through the museum on a responsive website. Free of charge, the digital format in German and English allows the public to get into the right mood for the issues of the exhibition before visiting it. In order to make this familiarization possible, the digitorial presents instructive particulars, comprehensive relationships, and background stories combined in a novel visual way on the website. The multi-media linkage of image, sound, and text ensures a multiple interweaving of contents and permits entirely new forms of representing, describing and communicating art – whether at home, in a café, or on the way to the exhibition. The first digitorial was conceived for the exhibition “Helene Schjerfbeck” on show at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt as of 2 October 2014. The digitorial can be retrieved from the website www.schirn.de/schjerfbeck/en/ free of charge as of now.

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PRESS RELEASE: PAPARAZZI! PHOTOGRAPHERS, STARS AND ARTISTS

26.06.2014 | With “Paparazzi! Photographers, Stars and Artists”, beginning on June 27, 2014, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents the most extensive exhibition in Germany on the global phenomenon and the aesthetic of paparazzi photography to date. Around 500 works and documents trace the unbroken fascination with star photography and at the same time reflect its influence on the visual arts and fashion photography. The presentation features “icons” of paparazzi photography that have been permanently etched on our visual memory, including Jackie Kennedy-Onassis during an seemingly casual walk through Manhattan, Lady Di fleeing from a frenzy of flashing cameras, or the younger “favorites” of paparazzi such as Paris Hilton or Britney Spears. Besides works by the most well-known representatives of paparazzi photography, such as Ron Galella, Pascal Rostain, Bruno Mouron, or Tazio Secchiaroli, the large-scale exhibition presents positions by artists such as Cindy Sherman, Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Barbara Kruger, Paul McCarthy, and Richard Avedon, who have critically examined and sounded out the specific characteristics of the paparazzi aesthetic. Developed and organized by the Centre Pompidou-Metz, using photographs, videos, paintings, sculptures, work objects, documents, and much more the exhibition tells stories from 50 years of paparazzi photography and sets it sights on the paparazzo himself. The presentation, which has been divided into three chapters, focuses on a profession that is admired and feared in equal measure and which secures its existence for the most part by means of secretly tracking and stalking famous celebrities and has made the tabloid press one of the highest-selling areas in the press sector – always on the scout and with the goal of publishing exclusive pictures of the unsuspected, the ostensibly confidential, and the personal. In the process, the exhibition also reveals the complex relationships and dependencies that occasionally develop between stars and the photographer.

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PRESS RELEASE: INFINITE JEST

19.05.2014 | The credo of today’s society without boundaries reads “ever faster, ever higher, ever further.” In the early twenty-first century, man, oscillating between euphoria and depression, finds himself confronted with the promising opportunities of a global and virtual world as well as the challenge to constantly improve, optimize, and shape his life more efficiently. The exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt on display from June 5 until September 7, 2014 focuses on this phenomenon. Based on works by eighteen contemporary artists such as Maurizio Cattelan, Peter Coffin, Judith Hopf, Andrea Fraser, Claire Fontaine, Alicja Kwade, Ryan Trecartin, and Daniel Richter, it unfolds an image of a present-day world with the individual at its center. The works on display are not aimed at visualizing the contents of the eponymous epochal novel “Infinite Jest” by David Foster Wallace. The show rather explores the various demands confronting today’s individual, in which the modes of resistance and the contradictions of a reality often described as lacking any alternative make themselves felt.

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PRESS RELEASE: DANIELE BUETTI. IT'S ALL IN THE MIND

07.05.2014 | Hypnosis as an artistic action: Daniele Buetti (*1955) invites visitors of the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt to participate in collective meditative hypnosis. The prominent contemporary Swiss artist has developed, for the first time, a sound installation for the freely accessible Schirn Rotunda: “It’s all in the mind”. It is based on an audio experience (23 minutes) in which the public is directly included by means of hypnosis. The installation focuses on a so-called “color cleansing”, a guided meditation technique that can be traced back to Dr. Arno Müller, a retired psychology professor at the University of Applied Sciences in Frankfurt am Main. While relaxing on cushions in the Rotunda, visitors will be asked to visualize the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. In this ceremony, each color operates as a representative or thing. Bringing the colors to mind is believed to liberate participants from burdensome feelings or negative thought patterns. Most decisive is the effect that the professor’s hypnotic speech act – emphatic and clear – as on the listener’s body. The “color cleansing” is intended to help each participant recharge his mental and emotional resources. By transferring hypnosis into the public space of the Schirn Rotunda and into the context of an artwork, Daniele Buetti breaks with intimacy, one of the basic conditions of hypnosis sessions. At the same time, the artist addresses the fascination that radiates from hypnotic states, mind-expanding rites, esotericism, and spirituality. In a day and age in which youths meet at so-called Holi festivals to celebrate explosions of color, Daniele Buetti artistically extends the question of how colors take effect and what they can bring about. Visitors and passers-by not only participate, they are an essential part of an art action that focuses on the hypnotic experience, self-examination, and transforming the human psyche. Any visible colors have been removed from the space of the Rotunda. As the title indicates, color suggestion and “color cleansing” take place in the visitors’ mind. The boundaries between happening and serious science become blurred. Daniele Buetti’s installation occupies the seemingly unprotected and soulless Schirn Rotunda and lends it new meaning; it becomes a place where people can examine themselves.

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PRESS RELEASE: TOBIAS REHBERGER HOME AND AWAY AND OUTSIDE

11.02.2014 | With the large-scale exhibition “Tobias Rehberger. Home and Away and Outside,” the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt pays tribute to one of the most influential German artists of his generation. Born in 1966 and living and working in Frankfurt am Main, Tobias Rehberger is internationally renowned for his trenchant and witty works. Numerous awards and exhibitions honor the artist whose complex oeuvre occupies an outstanding position within today’s art production. Showing more than sixty works, the Schirn presents Rehberger’s first major exhibition in Frankfurt from February 21 to May 11, 2014. Developed in close collaboration with him, the presentation sheds light on his work’s variety in terms of media, subjects, and contexts as well as on his development as an artist on an area of over 700 square meters. Rehberger has conceived an elaborate solution for the exhibition architecture integrating exhibits from his work of the last twenty years. The beginning is made with a continuation of his award-winning work Was du liebst, bringt dich auch zum Weinen (2009) for the 53rd Venice Biennial. The entire hall of the Schirn will be furnished with an installation whose optical flicker recalls the spirit of Op art for which Rehberger relies on the camouflage technique of dazzle painting mainly used for ships in World War I. In sharp contrast to it, the second chapter of the presentation unfolds as a completely white architectural landscape, which blurs the boundaries between platform and base, seating facility and walking area and extends across the entire West gallery. The third part of the exhibition features a new large-format sculpture developed for the freely accessible Schirn Rotunda. Thematically divided into three sections, the show highlights the manifold nature of Rehberger’s oeuvre with exceptional works from the purported design quotations of his Kamerun- und documenta-Stühle (1994) and his vases based on the originally nine-part series one (1995) to the group of works titled Fragments of their pleasant spaces (in my fashionable version) (1994/1996/2009), which resulted from a joint authorship – one of the basic themes Rehberger has dedicated himself to.

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PRESS RELEASE: ESPRIT MONTMARTRE BOHEMIAN LIFE IN PARIS AROUND 1900

08.01.2014 | Not without reason, a contemporary critic in the 1890s wrote about Montmartre in Paris: “The quarter resembles a huge studio.” Important artists such as Edgar Degas, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, or Vincent van Gogh lived and worked there. With a previously unsuspected realism, they produced memorable paintings that mercilessly revealed the underbelly of the dazzling Belle Époque. With these works, which remain unique even today, they crucially influenced the history of art in the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century. From February 7, 2014, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents the first group exhibition with more than 200 works, and focuses on the quarter of Montmartre with its stories and protagonists. Various phenomena are explored in different thematic sections: “Montmartre as a Village – A View of a different Paris” confronts the visitor with atmospheric views of the neighborhood’s topography. The exhibition then highlights the “Cafés, Absinthe Drinkers, and Varietés” and the representation of “Models, Dancers, and Prostitutes.” A further section deals with “The Fantasy Land of the Circus.” “The Montmartre as an Area for Outsiders and Social Change” introduces the visitor to the inhabitants of the district, its labourers, beggars, clochards, and washerwomen, but also to the people who participated in demonstrations in these politically and socially agitating days. While “The Network of Artists and Art Dealers” sheds light on the exchange between artists and the flourishing art market in the quarter, the last section is dedicated to “The Poster as a New Art Form” and magazine illustrations.

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EXHIBITION PROGRAM 2014

01.01.2014 | “The quarter resembles a huge studio,” wrote a contemporary critic in the 1890s about the Montmartre in Paris. An alternative world to the mundane Paris of the Belle Époque, Montmartre, situated on a hill on what was then the outskirts of the city, had preserved its rural, original flair, which alongside poets and composers such as Erik Satie und Jacques Offenbach also attracted numerous prominent painters, including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, or Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. This other Paris found literary expression as a microcosm for artists in Henry Murger’s novel Scènes de la vie de bohème (1847–49), but would soon fascinate others who consciously decided to live as poor bohemians on the fringe of society and also reflected this new perception of themselves as voluntary-involuntary outsiders in their art in a particularly realistic and striking way. The special atmosphere of the district with its stories and protagonists such as dancers, prostitutes, absinthe drinkers, and hedonists can be memorably experienced in the exhibition. The exhibition presents more than two hundred works of art by Pierre Bonnard, Ramon Casas, Edgar Degas, Kees van Dongen, Vincent van Gogh, Max Jacob, Marie Laurencin, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, or Suzanne Valadon as well as historical photographs and numerous posters and prints from the birth of bohemianism in Paris around 1900.

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PRESS RELEASE: RONI HORN. PORTRAIT OF AN IMAGE

20.11.2013 | In collaboration with the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, the American artist Roni Horn (*1955) is presenting an extended form of a photographic work she developed in 2005, “Portrait of an Image (with Isabelle Huppert)”: sixteen striking interventions comprised of selected motifs from the serial work are distributed in Frankfurt’s urban space, while the complete one-hundred-part series of portraits is being shown in the walkways of the rotunda of the Schirn. This is the very first staging in public space of this kind within Roni Horn’s artistic oeuvre. The two-part series “Portrait of an Image (with Isabelle Huppert)”—each of which consists of fifty photographs in sequences of five motifs each—is based on a collaboration between Horn and the French film and stage actress Isabelle Huppert. Together they selected earlier roles Huppert had played that the actress then performed again for the camera. For these photographs, Huppert visualized her repertoire solely on the basis of her memory, without the aid of the scripts or the films themselves.

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PRESS RELEASE: PHILIP GUSTON. LATE WORKS

21.10.2013 | The bold and extraordinary oeuvre of the American painter Philip Guston (1913–1980) was one of the most widely discussed of his time. He was the first to return figuration to postwar American painting, was innovative in his combination of “high art” with images from popular culture, and is today celebrated as the pioneer of postmodern, figurative painting. On the occasion of the artist’s 100th birthday, from November 6, 2013, to February 2, 2014, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting late works by Philip Guston as a milestone of American painting. With a selection of seventy paintings and drawings, the exhibition unites loans from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. The autodidact Guston gained a foothold in New York’s art scene in the 1950s and became one of the most important representatives of Abstract Expression around Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Mark Rothko. An intense drawing phase began in the late 1960s, culminating in a painterly break with the “purity requirements” of abstraction: Guston introduced crude figures and fragments of figures into his works; they populated his pink, red, black, and blue canvases - smoking, drinking, often painting as well. Guston’s subjects include large heads, hairy legs, clumsy shoes, and all manner of architectural fragments such as walls, doors, and light bulbs reminiscent of 1920s comics, and they often come over as the precursors of “Bad Painting”. The large-format works come down full force on the viewer. Despite their apparent formal weightiness, content-related openness, and blurred mystification, the paintings are based on profound sensitivity and the artist’s far-reaching content-related and painterly consistency. In 1970, the first exhibition of these paintings outfitted with an anarchistic sense of humor and the grotesque caused an art scandal in New York, as numerous critics took offense at his “betrayal” of abstract art. Yet the intensity and unsettling power of Guston’s late works exercise an enormous influence on many of today’s younger artists.

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PRESS RELEASE: GÉRICAULT. IMAGES OF LIFE AND DEATH

30.09.2013 | From October 18, 2013, to January 26, 2014, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents the first solo exhibition on Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) in Germany. The short-lived painter was one of the great masters of nineteenth-century French painting, and is considered a forerunner of French Romanticism. Géricault’s pictures exude an almost ebullient force of life, which always stands with one foot next to the abyss. With roughly 130 loans from Paris, Lyon, Montpellier, Ghent, Brussels, London, New York, Los Angeles, and elsewhere the wide-ranging Frankfurt exhibition focuses on two of the French artist’s core thematic complexes: the physical suffering of modern man, most impressively expressed in his pictures of severed heads and limbs linking life and death, and his psychic torments, masterfully illustrated in Géricault’s portraits of monomaniacs. In a focused overview these two groups of works are placed in the context of his œuvre as well as in the art of his time, thus shedding new light on Géricault’s intellectual assumptions and his connection to the history of medicine and illustrating the reciprocal relationship between art and science. Sixty-two works by Géricault are thus juxtaposed with works by Francisco de Goya, Eugène Delacroix, and Adolph Menzel. The exhibition, curated by Gregor Wedekind, presents Géricault’s novel, observant vision of the fate of modern man, and gives an impression of the artist’s radical realism, which assures him a crucial position in the history of European art. Situated midway between the unsentimental perspective of science and the Romantic fondness for the unfathomable, Géricault’s profoundly human pictures call into question our traditional understanding of realism and Romanticism as mutually exclusive styles of his epoch. Of particular note is the presentation in Frankfurt of four of Géricault’s five famous Monomaniacs. Such a presentation was possible only once before, in 1991 at the major Géricault retrospective in Paris’s Grand Palais. The missing fifth portrait, which cannot be loaned, is replaced by a painting created specifically for the present exhibition by the South African artist Marlene Dumas (born 1953), who currently lives in Amsterdam. In an impressive and surprising way, her work serves as a contemporary counterpoint to Géricault’s masterpieces.

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PRESS RELEASE: BRASILIANA. INSTALLATIONS FROM 1960 TO THE PRESENT

11.09.2013 | On the occasion of Brazil being guest of honor at this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting a large exhibition on the installation in Brazil. Eight large-scale works will transform the Schirn from 2 October 2013 to 5 January 2014 into a series of spaces that can be experienced intensely by the senses and installations into which viewers are directly integrated as participants. With examples of installations from the late 1960s to the latest artistic positions, the exhibition demonstrates the specifically Brazilian aspect of this “art of experience.” The exhibition combines positions now considered classical, like those of Hélio Oiticica and Neville D’Almeida, Lygia Clark, Tunga, and Cildo Meireles, with works by younger artists such as Ernesto Neto, Maria Nepomuceno, Henrique Oliviera, and Dias & Riedweg and thus continues the history of the installation in Brazil through to the present.

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PRESS RLEASE: STREET-ART BRAZIL

06.08.2013 | In conjunction with Brazil’s appearance as guest of honour at the Frankfurt Book Fair in 2013, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting the multifaceted world of Brazilian graffiti art for the first time ever in Germany. The major cities of Brazil are home to one of the world’s most vital and fascinating graffiti scenes. In terms of both content and aesthetic quality, this colourful, dynamic and unique movement differs significantly from the American and European street-art scenes. Brazilian street art stands apart from the globalized graffiti culture by virtue not only of the specific political and social climate in a country rocked by profound upheavals but also because of the incredible abundance of styles and techniques it encompasses. Eleven artists and artist groups from São Paulo and other Brazilian cities have been invited to exhibit their paintings in urban settings throughout Frankfurt, beginning with the Schirn building, and thus to alter the everyday image of the city. Their works include figurative and abstract, light-hearted and socially critical paintings ranging from oversized murals to unpretentious, ephemeral signs and symbols. They will appear, among other places, on bank towers, bridge abutments on the banks of the Main, the floor of the “Hauptwache”, “St. Matthäus” Church and the former city police presidium. Yet another highlight is a painted subway train. Known as a “whole train”, this form of graffiti is regarded as the supreme discipline among graffiti artists. A mobile app developed specifically for the exhibition featuring a wealth of background information and artists’ videos is available to help visitors navigate as they stroll through downtown Frankfurt.

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PRESS RELEASE: PHILIP-LORCA DICORCIA PHOTOGRAPHS 1975-2012

03.06.2013 | Beginning June 20, 2013, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is hosting the first European survey of the oeuvre of US photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia. Born in 1951, diCorcia is one of the most important and influential contemporary photographers. His images oscillate between everyday elements and arrangements that are staged down to the smallest detail. In his works, seemingly realistic images that are taken with an ostensibly documentary eye are undermined by their highly elaborate orchestration. One of the primary issues that diCorcia addresses is the question of whether it is possible to depict reality, and this is what links his photographs, most of which he creates as series. For Hustlers (1990–1992), for example, he took pictures of male prostitutes in meticulously staged settings, while in what is probably his most famous series, Heads (2000–2001), he captured an instant in the everyday lives of unsuspecting passers-by. Alongside the series Streetwork (1993–1999), Lucky 13 (2004) and A Storybook Life (1975–1999), the exhibition at the Schirn, which was organized in close collaboration with the artist, will also present works from his new and ongoing East of Eden (2008–) project for the first time.

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PRESS RELEASE: GLAM! THE PERFORMANCE OF STYLE

31.05.2013 | A visually excessive means of expression, the early 1970s aesthetics of Glam had a style-defining impact that went far beyond the art scene. After its major exhibition projects “Summer of Love” (2005) and “Op Art” (2007), which focused on cross-genre developments in the art and culture of the 1960s, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt now highlights another, very dynamic era of art history with the show “Glam! The Performance of Style,” on display from June 14 until September 22, 2013. Glam describes the extravagant style that musicians such as David Bowie and Marc Bolan made popular in Great Britain in the early 1970s and which by brashly linking high culture and subculture questioned socially passed-on concepts such as identity and gender became a worldwide phenomenon. Its origins can be traced back to Andy Warhol’s strategies as well as the British art college scene, where the painter and graphic artist Richard Hamilton with his thesis that all art genres were equal in status exercised a strong influence on his student Bryan Ferry. Bryan Ferry was to emerge as the mastermind of the band Roxy Music and became the very epitomé of the absolute art Glam product, combining avant-gardism, Pop Art, and Art Deco, Camp, Trash and kitsch elements as well as traditional Hollywood chic to form an ultra-artificial aesthetic. The exhibition at the Schirn for the first time explores the manifold influences of the Glam era on film, photography, fashion, graphic design, performance and installation art, painting, and sculpture. The show presents about one hundred works by such artists as Guy Bourdin, Gilbert & George, Peter Hujar, Ray Johnson, Allen Jones, Jürgen Klauke, Ed Paschke, Sigmar Polke, Cindy Sherman, and Ulay, and is rounded out by photographs by Mick Rock and Karl Stoecker, original costumes, and extensive documentary material.

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PRESS RELEASE: LAST WORKS. FROM MANET TO KIPPENBERGER

27.02.2013 | From February 28 to June 2, 2013, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents a lavish thematic show titled “Last Works. From Manet to Kippenberger” which comprises about one hundred exhibits. Outstanding works and groups of works dating from the late nineteenth century to the present strikingly demonstrate the final intensification or even surprising turn within an artist’s oeuvre. The exhibition centers on works by fourteen artists such as Claude Monet and Henri Matisse, who produced a late work that has received acclaim in the meantime, or Martin Kippenberger and Bas Jan Ader, who, when they died young, left us an almost unknown “late work.” Thematically framed confrontations in seven consecutive rooms assemble works by artists from Willem de Kooning, Alexej von Jawlensky, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Andy Warhol to Francis Picabia or Ad Reinhardt and, in doing so, offer sometimes surprising views of the selected artists’ oeuvres.

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PRESS RELEASE: YOKO ONO – HALF-A-WIND SHOW. A RETROSPECTIVE

14.02.2013 | Yoko Ono is one of the most influential artists of our time. In honor of the 80th birthday of the artist, who was born in Tokyo on February 18, 1933, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is presenting an extensive retrospective encompassing a representative selection of her works from the past 60 years. From February 15 to May 12, 2013, the Frankfurt exhibition will feature a comprehensive survey of the multifaceted universe of this extraordinary artist, who is regarded as a pioneer of early conceptual, film and performance art as well as a key figure in the world of music, the peace movement and feminism, who continues to play an influential role in current developments in art. Some 200 objects, films, spatial installations, photographs, drawings and textual pieces as well as a special music room will shed light on the diverse media landscape of Ono’s art and the central themes of her oeuvre. The retrospective devotes particular attention to Yoko Ono’s works from the 1960s and 1970s. It features, among other exhibits, such groundbreaking works as the Instructions for Paintings first exhibited in 1961 and 1962, the performance Cut Piece (1964), and her book Grapefruit, published in 1964, which firmly established Yoko Ono’s influential position within the avant-garde in Japan and the United States and the Fluxus movement associated with George Maciunas. Several large-scale installations and recent works by this world-renowned artist will also be shown at the exhibition. Yoko Ono has also developed a new work – the installation and performance Moving Mountains – specifically for the exhibition in Frankfurt.

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Exhibition Program 2013

01.01.2013 | Yoko Ono is one of the most influential artists alive today. To mark her 80th birthday, (Ono was born on 18 February 1933 in Tokyo) Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt is hosting a comprehensive retrospective that presents a characteristic selection of the last 60 years of her artistic output. About 100 sculptures, films, installations, photos, drawings and text-based pieces as well as a dedicated music room will highlight just how Ono’s work cuts across the different media while underscoring her central themes, offering an almost complete overview of the incredibly diverse cosmos of this quite extraordinary artist. Yoko Ono came to fame with her trailblazing works in the early 1960s, which first went on display in New York and later in Japan, including her Instructions for Paintings (exhibited in 1961 and 1962), her Cut Piece performance (1964-65) and her book Grapefruit, which was published in 1964 and shored up the thrust of her work. The retrospective attached special attention to Yoko Ono’s works from the 1960s and 1970s, her incisive influence on the Fluxus movement, on Concept and performance art, on Environments, film and music, her efforts on behalf of world peace and her constant commitment to moving her trailblazing ideas forward. Several of the world-famous artist’s spacious installations and current works will likewise be on show. Indeed, Yoko Ono has specially developed a new piece, the Moving Mountains installation and performance – for the retrospective at Schirn Kunsthalle.

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PRESS RELEASE: PRIVACY

31.10.2012 | From November 1, 2012 to February 3, 2013 the Schirn will be presenting numerous contempo-rary artworks with a view to exploring the topic of the disappearing private sphere and the “public nature of the intimate”. Privacy – today this almost seems like a concept from the past. It hardly appears apt in times when everything is posted on Facebook, from your favorite recipe to your current relationship status. Exhibitionism, self-revelation, the urge to tell stories, the pleasure of presenting and voyeurism are the social strategies of our day and age – a structural change of the public sphere has long since taken place. Showcasing around 30 artistic positions, the exten-sive group show “Privacy” impressively explores the fragile boundaries between the public and the private sphere. Photographs, Polaroids, cell-phone photos, objects, installations and films show domestic scenes and reveal personal secrets. Familiar and intimate things are visually communicated. In 1959 Stan Brakhage presented to his audience a film documenting the birth of his first child. Ryan McGinley captures seemingly authentic moments in his photographic compo-sitions of friends and acquaintances, Michael Wolf underscores the easy availability of computer images by photographing scenes from Google Street View from his screen and Tracy Emin in-stalls her used bed in the middle of the exhibition space. Further artistic explorations of the radi-cal disappearance of the private sphere and the path to a post-private society are provided by Ai Weiwei, Merry Alpern, Michel Auder, Mike Bouchet, Leo Gabin, Nan Goldin, Dash Snow, Mark Wallinger, Andy Warhol and many other contemporary artists.

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PRESS RELEASE: GUSTAVE CAILLEBOTTE. AN IMPRESSIONIST AND PHOTOGRAPHY

11.09.2012 | The Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt presents a comprehensive exhibition featuring about fifty paintings and drawings by the French Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte from October 18, 2012 to January 20, 2013. Consistently rounded off with one hundred and fifty outstanding photographic positions of the late nineteenth and the early twentieth century, the show conveys a clear idea of Caillebotte’s pioneering role in the development of a new way of seeing. While this extraordinary artist has already assumed his rightful place next to great Impressionists like Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet, or Edgar Degas in France, Great Britain, and the United States, a critical examination of Caillebotte’s production is still in its early stages in Germany. Caillebotte’s oeuvre offers new, fundamental, and complementary approaches to French Impressionist painting: his radical, highly modern, and photography-related solutions very convincingly elucidate the close connection between photography and painting. Numerous of Caillebotte’s works anticipate a photographic perspective – especially in their particular angles of view and the way the images are cropped, but also in their approach to themes like movement and abstraction – that does not emerge in the medium of photography itself until later.

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PRESS RELEASE: MICHAEL RIEDEL. KUNSTE ZUR TEXT

15.05.2012 | Recording – labeling – playback. Frankfurt-based artist Michael Riedel has been investigating the issue of reproduction and repetition since his first performances in the context of the legendary art space “Oskar-von-Miller-Straße 16,” which he initiated at this address in Frankfurt in 2000. This was the venue of repetitions or copies of exhibitions, concerts, readings, club evenings, and of the “Freitagsküche” (Friday Kitchen), an event amidst art and life continued to this day. Riedel works with recorded conversations, films, performances, or other artists’ shows. His system of production is based on the combination of these elements into ever new variations and on the transformation of one medium into another. Through the process of transcription, for example, Riedel transfers voice recordings into the visual realm, defamiliarizing and expanding them with the help of technological means in order to ultimately reproduce them in a new variation or replay them. With “Kunste zur Text,” the Schirn Kunsthalle presents a first retrospective of Michael Riedel’s work.

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PRESS RELEASE: JEFF KOONS. THE PAINTER & THE SCULPTOR

26.04.2012 | This summer, the Schirn Kunsthalle and the Liebieghaus Skulpturensammlung will be devoting themselves to the work of the U.S. American artist Jeff Koons (born in 1955), who has played a pioneering role in the contemporary art world since the 1980s. The two concurrent shows will deliberately separate the sculptural and painterly aspects of his oeuvre and present each in a context of its own. Encompassing some forty paintings, the presentation entitled “Jeff Koons. The Painter” at the Schirn will focus primarily on the artist’s structural development as a painter. With motifs drawn from a diverse range of high and pop-cultural sources, his monumental painted works combine hyper-realistic and gestural elements to form complexes as compact in imagery as they are with regard to content. In the show “Jeff Koons. The Sculptor” at the Liebieghaus, on the other hand, altogether around 50 world-famous as well as entirely new sculptures by Jeff Koons will enter into dialogues with the historical building and a sculpture collection spanning five millennia. Jeff Koons’s Antiquity, a new series in which he explores antique art and its central motif – Eros – will debut in Frankfurt on this occasion.

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PRESS RELEASE: BETTINA POUSTTCHI. FRAMEWORK

26.03.2012 | The Schirn Kunsthalle is showcasing a new work by German-Iranian artist Bettina Pousttchi spe-cifically designed for the exterior of the Schirn. Similar to her well-received installation “Echo” (2009/10) in Berlin – where she resurrected the just demolished Palast der Republik (the former East German parliament building) in the form of a monumental photo installation applied to the façade of the Temporäre Kunsthalle (Temporary Art Hall) – her Frankfurt piece will likewise cover a large portion of the building façade. In “Framework” Pousttchi has taken timber framework elements from two buildings on Frankfurt’s Römer square out of the context of their original façades and combines them into an ornament composed of modules, each measuring one by one meter, infinitely repeated, lending a harmonious rhythm to the overall look of the Schirn. In their interlinking of architecture, sculpture, and photography Pousttchi’s monumental photo installations broaden the traditional understanding of photography. They examine the question of how to approach urban space and memory while at the same time exploring the temporal dimension of architecture.

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PRESS RELEASE: GEORGE CONDO. MENTAL STATES

13.01.2012 | Ironic, provocative, witty—since his beginnings in New York’s East Village in the early 1980s American artist George Condo has produced a distinctive body of work. His paintings, characterized by mordant humor, surrealist-tinged absurdity, and exuberant pathos, make repeated reference to the traditions of American and European art history of the last 500 years, from Velázquez by way of Picasso to Gorky. In partnership with the Hayward Gallery in London and curated by Hayward Director Ralph Rugoff, the Schirn is pleased to present a comprehensive retrospective of Condo’s art. Condo works in a style that can be described as artificial realism, and both his paintings and sculptures display his ongoing examination of human physiognomy and all-too-human mental states. Organized thematically and stylistically in groups, sixty-six important paintings from different creative periods, as well as a selection of roughly ten sculptures and new works by the artist will be exhibited at the Schirn.

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PRESS RELEASE: EDVARD MUNCH. THE MODERN EYE

06.01.2012 | Edvard Munch (1863–1944) is acclaimed for his emotional Symbolist painting and regarded as a pioneer of Expressionism. The exhibition in the Schirn, which has been prepared together with the Centre Pompidou in Paris, offers a new view of his work: Edvard Munch was a modern artist to his core – thus the hypothesis of the show that comprises about one hundred and thirty works. “Edvard Munch. The Modern Eye” gives the little-researched late work until 1944 special emphasis and proves that Munch was not only an artist of the nineteenth, but also of the twentieth century. The presentation focuses on Munch’s engagement with modern techniques like photography and film or the intimate theater stage. A study of his works reveals the degree to which the artist adopted specifically photographic or filmic forms of composition and narration, poses, and even effects in his painting. Besides the approximately sixty paintings and twenty works on paper, two chapters of the presentation are reserved for Munch’s own production as a photographer and filmmaker. Fifty vintage photographs as well as four films will be included in the show. A further dimension of the exhibition highlights how the artist dealt with one and the same motif in drawing, photography, painting, the field of graphic art, and even sculpture and shows that the frequent return to certain motifs constitutes an important key for understanding Munch’s oeuvre.

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EXHIBITION PROGRAM 2012

01.01.2012 | Edvard Munch is acclaimed for his vivid Symbolist painting and regarded as a pioneer of Expressionism. Organized by the Centre Pompidou – Musée National d’art moderne in Paris, in cooperation with the Munch Museum in Oslo, the exhibition in the Schirn offers a novel view of his work. It is for the first time that Munch’s interest in modern techniques of creating pictures such as photography and film and modern stage designs is the focus of attention. His works reveal to what degree he adopted specifically photographic or filmic forms of composition and narration, poses, or even effects in his painting. Supplementing the presentation of about sixty paintings and twenty works on paper, one chapter of the show is dedicated to Munch’s own attempts in the field of photography and film. A further dimension of the exhibition reveals how the artist dealt with one and the same subject in drawing, photography, painting, graphic art, and sculpture. The artist’s frequent return to already rendered motifs provides a crucial key to the understanding of Munch’s work.

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