THE MYTH OF THE CANVAS

THE MYTH OF WILDERNESS AND THE LANDSCAPE PAINTING OF THE GROUP OF SEVEN FROM AN ECOCRITICAL PERSPECTIVE
THURSDAY, MAY 27, 2021, 4 p.m.

In the final lecture of the MYTHOS LEINWAND series, art historian Isabelle Gapp discusses key works by the Group of Seven and counters the widely held narratives of wilderness and nation in Canada with an ecocritical view. The focus is on the north shore of Lake Superior in the landscape paintings of Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, J.E.H. MacDonald, and Franklin Carmichael. From an environmental history perspective, this will lead to reflections on exploitation and conservation in the 20th century as well as colo¬nial history and the Indigenous communities that originally lived in the region.

There will be an opportunity to ask questions afterwards.

The livestream will take place here, and on YouTube and Face­book. There is no charge for this offering. IN ENGLISH

REPRESENTATION OF INDIGENOUS ART IN MUSEUMS

The Anishi­naabe-kwe curator Wanda Nanibush (Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto) addresses the repre­sen­ta­tion of indige­nous art in museums and cultural insti­tu­tions, noting its gradual shift since the 1960s from the realm of ethno­graphic museums to galleries and art museums. Contem­po­rary ways of presenting indige­nous posi­tions demon­strate how they have influ­enced percep­tions of art and their history, and how indige­nous contem­po­rary artists are chal­lenging the notion of the museum as an insti­tu­tion in general.

PAST LECTURES IN THE SERIES "THE MYTH OF THE CANVAS"

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON THE REPRESENTATION OF THE ARCTIC IN MODERN TIMES

As a prelude to THE MYTH OF THE CANVAS series, art historian Bart Pushaw (University of Copenhagen) examined the complex artistic creativity going on in the Arctic during the 1930s using the example of the Pannirtuuq (Pangnirtung) settlement. He presented works by renowned Canadian Modernists Lawren Harris and A. Y. Jackson, who either blend out or romanticize the presence of the native Inuit in their depictions. This is in stark contrast to the everyday reality of the native inhabitants, which is marked by social and ecological repression, and with the vibrant, contemporary Modernism of the Inuit artists.