FILMS FROM THE EXHIBITION MAGNETIC NORTH

The history of Indigenous peoples in the land that now makes up Canada was told overwhelmingly through the colonial lens – and that’s still the case today, although it’s now changing. These days, Indigenous people are better depicted in film and media and there are also many Indigenous filmmakers as well as artists, whose impressive works are being recognized both in and outside of Canada.

Gain insight into Canada's moving history with the MAGNETIC NORTH Digitorial®.

„HOW A PEOPLE LIVE“

LISA JACKSON

The film was commissioned by the Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'xw First Nation, whose members were forcibly relocated by the Canadian government in 1964. From their ancestral land on the coast of British Columbia, they had to move to Tsulquate, a newly established reserve near Port Hardy on the territory of the Kwakiutl. Using interviews and historical film footage, Anishinaabe filmmaker Lisa Jackson vividly documents the history of this community, the traumas associated with resettlement and its consequences: Hardship, disease, alcohol addiction, or forced internment of children into a school re-education system. The filmmaker accompanies the members of the surviving people on a journey back to their homeland, during which they re-encounter their memories and traditions.

„MOBILIZE“

Caroline Monnet

The film collage of Caroline Monnet is a montage from the holdings of the archive of the National Film Board. For the initiative “Souvenirs,” the organization invited Monnet and other Indigenous filmmakers to address questions of identity and representation using existing material, to portray it anew from their specific perspective.

Learn more about documenting Indigenous culture in the FIRST NATIONS chapter with the MAGNETIC NORTH Digitorial®

"LAND AND TERRITORY ARE EVERYTHING. LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND IDENTITY ARE CONNECTED TO THOSE CORE CONCEPTS." CARO­LINE MONNET