NEW! THE SCHIRN BOOKCLUB

THURSDAY, APRIL 21, MAY 12 + JUNE 2, 7 PM

In the SCHIRN's new BOOKCLUB, we read texts together in the context of the exhibition ART FOR NO ONE in order to open up new perspectives and build bridges to art. Moderated by Frankfurt-based author Cecily Ogunjobi and experts on individual topics, including SCHIRN curator Ilka Voermann.

INTERNAL EMIGRATION

THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 7 PM

In the first session we will read texts written during the period 1933-45 that deal with the Nazi regime in a coded way. On the basis of an excerpt from Klaus Mann's exile novel "The Volcano," we will shed light on the debate surrounding the term "inner emigration. What does this supposed retreat mean and how is it to be evaluated today? We delve into this question by looking at other texts by Stefan Andres and the Frankfurt author Marie Luise Kaschnitz, who remained in Germany and continued to work. What was written during that time, what was published? How can we classify their works and can we find bridges to art?

DICTATORSHIP

THURSDAY, MAY 12, 7 PM

What is a dictatorship? How does one live in a dictatorship and how is art instrumentalized in a totalitarian state? Using classics from literature, such as Orwell's "1984," or contemporary novels, such as Oliver Hilmes' "Berlin 1936," we approach the topic and uncover strategies of propaganda in art. An excerpt of a lecture by Hannah Arendt helps us to think about personal responsibility in dictatorships. Based on the texts, we make connections to works in the exhibition, discuss questions of morality, being a follower, and the silent masses, and, last but not least, take a very concrete look at the topic of perpetration.

GUILT & DISPLACEMENT

THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 7 PM

In the last session we move further and further towards the present and deal with the topics of displacement and guilt. How is displacement defined in psychology and philosophy? How can we deal with the question of guilt today and what can we learn from literature? Ilse Aichinger's short story "Der Kai" forms the conclusion of the first BOOKCLUB for the exhibition and raises very topical questions: Aichinger lived in Vienna as a "half-Jew" and had to go into hiding until the end of the war to escape deportation. In "Der Kai," Aichinger makes reference to her own life, describing war and expulsion, but deliberately anchors the events neither geographically nor historically. Rather, the terms are assigned a symbolic meaning and thus generalized: anywhere and at any time it could take place and have taken place.